birding New Jersey

Purple Martin Male Adult

Purple Martin perched
Purple Martin
click on image to enlarge

Purple Martin is a swallow that feeds in midair, catching large, aerial insects such as dragonflies. The picture of this Purple Martin male adult was photographed at the Fosythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey.

Black Scoter Duck

Black Scoter Female

Black Scoter Female

The picture of this Black Scoter Duck Female was photographed in the waters off the Barnegat Lighthouse Jetty in New Jersey on very cold windy day. This Black Scoter was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens. Groups of Black Scoters often can be located by the constant mellow, plaintive whistling sound of the males.
To hear the song of the Black Scoter, click on the arrow below.

Northern Shoveler in Flight

Northern Shoveler Drake in Flight

Northern Shoveler Drake in Flight

Northern Shoveler in Flight

The picture of this Northern Shoveler in Flight was photographed at the Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey. This Northern Shoveler was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens.
To hear the sounds of the Northern Shoveler, click on the arrow below.

Red-winged Blackbird in Flight

Red-winged Blackbird in Flight

Red-winged Blackbird in Flight

Red-winged Blackbird in Flight

The Red-winged Blackbird is one of the most abundant birds across North America, and one of the most boldly colored. The picture of this Red-winged Blackbird in Flight was photographed at the Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey. This Red-winged Blackbird was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens.
To hear the sounds of the Red-winged Blackbird, click on the arrow below.

Dunlin Wings Up

Dunlin Wings Up

Dunlin Wings Up

Dunlin Wings Up

The picture of this Dunlin Wings Up was photographed at the Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey. Dunlin with Wings Up was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens. Numbers wintering in some coastal areas have declined noticeably since the 1970s; the reasons for this are unknown.
To hear the sounds of the Dunlin , click on the arrow below.