birds of prey

Merlin on Branch

Merlin on Branch

Merlin on Branch

Merlin on Branch

The picture of this Merlin on Branch was photographed at the Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge in Queens, NY. This Merlin on Branch was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens
To hear the sounds of the Merlin, click on the arrow below.

Merlin

Merlin

Merlin

Merlin

The picture of this Merlin was photographed at Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge in Queens, New York. This Merlin was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV Canon 300mm f2.8 IS II with the 2X extender. Merlins are small, fierce falcons.
To hear the song of the Merlin, click on the arrow below.

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

The picture of this Red-tailed Hawk was taken at the Green-wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. The picture of this Red-tailed Hawk was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark III Canon 300mm f2.8 IS II with the 2X extender.
To hear the sounds of the Red-tailed Hawk, click on the arrow below.

Cooper’s Hawk

Cooper's Hawk

Cooper’s Hawk contemplating a bee

Cooper’s Hawk Contemplating a Bee

Once thought averse to towns and cities, Cooper’s Hawks are now fairly common urban and suburban birds. Some studies show their numbers are actually higher in towns than in their natural habitat, forests. Cities provide plenty of Rock Pigeon and Mourning Dove prey.

Turkey Vulture in Flight

Turkey Vulture in Flight

Turkey Vulture in Flight

Turkey Vulture in Flight

Not everyone sees vultures as a creepy harbinger of death—many see them as sacred for their cleanup role. Tibetan Buddhists practice “sky burials,” where animals, usually vultures, consume their dead. Similarly, Zoroastrians offer their dead to be consumed by vultures on a raised platform, called a dakhma. They regard vultures are precious animals that release the soul from the body.