Birds

Black Scoter Duck

Black Scoter Female

Black Scoter Female

The picture of this Black Scoter Duck Female was photographed in the waters off the Barnegat Lighthouse Jetty in New Jersey on very cold windy day. This Black Scoter was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens. Groups of Black Scoters often can be located by the constant mellow, plaintive whistling sound of the males.
To hear the song of the Black Scoter, click on the arrow below.

Northern Shoveler in Flight

Northern Shoveler Drake in Flight

Northern Shoveler Drake in Flight

Northern Shoveler in Flight

The picture of this Northern Shoveler in Flight was photographed at the Forsythe National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey. This Northern Shoveler was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens.
To hear the sounds of the Northern Shoveler, click on the arrow below.

Hermit Thrush Closeup

Hermit Thrush Closeup

Hermit Thrush Closeup

The picture of this Hermit Thrush Closeup was photographed at Green-wood Cemetery in Brooklyn. A more hardy bird than the other brown-backed thrushes, the Hermit Thrush migrates north earlier in spring and lingers later in fall than the others.
To hear the beautiful song of the Hermit Thrush, click on the arrow below.

Winter Wren

Winter Wren

Winter Wren

Winter Wren

The picture of this Winter Wren was photographed at Green-wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. This Winter Wren was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens. Per unit weight, the Winter Wren delivers its song with 10 times more power than a crowing rooster.
To hear the beautiful song of the Winter Wren, click on the arrow below.

Eastern Wood Peewee

Eastern Wood Peewee

Eastern Wood Peewee

Eastern Wood Peewee

The picture of this Eastern Wood Peewee was photographed at Green-wood Cemetery in Brooklyn, New York. This Eastern Wood Peewee was photographed with the Canon 5D Mark IV and the Canon 100-400 II lens. The Eastern Wood-Pewee and Western Wood-Pewee have different calls but are nearly impossible to tell apart by eye.
To hear the song of the Eastern Wood Peewee, click on the arrow below.